Make Them Go Away
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EXCERPT:

ACCESS AND ACCOMMODATION:
SOME THINGS TO KEEP IN MIND

From Chapter 16: The disability rights vision: beyond 'marketplace morality'.

Stores don't want anyone telling them how to design their entrances [for access]; how many steps they can have (or can't have); how heavy their doors can be. Yet they accept their city's building and fire codes, dictating to them how many people they can have in their restaurants, based on square footage, so that the place will not be a fire hazard. They accept that the city can inspect their electrical wiring to ensure that it "meets code" before they open for business. Yet they chafe if an individual wants an accommodation....

Some things to keep in mind about the discussion of costs of access and accommodation: People lie about costs. They either inflate the cost, or blame access for costs that are attributable to things like overcharging and construction snafus.

There is very little of an objective nature to the "real cost" of access. Much depends on whether access is viewed as something benefiting everyone -- or something extra, that only benefits a few (and, were it not for those few, would not have to be done).

The reason the issue of access and accommodation devolves into a complaint about cost so quickly is because it was allowed to do from the beginning by the law's initial backers in Congress. By allowing the insertion of "undue hardship" and "reasonable accommodation" language into the law, they made it acceptable to believe that the simple moral imperative of giving people access and individual accommodation was not something important enough, morally significant enough, to require. . . .

Everyone has individual circumstances needing individually tailored solutions. Does this have to do with people wanting more than they have a right to? No. In any circumstance other than a disabled person asking for "special," the accommodation is seen not as an "accommodation" so much as simply a choice. What people seeking "access and accommodation" really want is not something more than nondisabled people have -- but simply the same kinds of choices nondisabled people regard as their natural right. | BOOK ORDERING INFO |


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